Wellness dictionary

Little ABC for your spa-break questions ...

In their treatment discriptions, wellness hotels often use technical terms, which are hard to understand for potential guests. We have therefore collected and defined the most relevant terms in our small wellness ABC. A tip: Our wellness dictionary also supports word requests. You don't need to know the exact wording.


The King's bath  -  a relaxation bath to restore the body and soul

The King's bath has its roots in the 19th century. During this period, only wealthy people had bath at home and they were often extravagantly decorated. Nowadays, the King's bath is used in wellness treatments for the purpose of recovery and relaxation. The bath tub is made of solid bronze and does not only convey a sense of luxury; it also has a functional use as bronze has the ability to retain heat for longer periods of time.

Candles, dimmed lighting, soft music and a pleasant scent create an atmospheric scene, with most bath tubs having room for two people.
 
There are various types of King's baths. The King's bath water is quite often scented with an aromatherapy essence. This has a positive effect on the mind. A salt oil bath stabilises the skin’s pH balance, which helps reduce skin irritation and leaves a light, creamy film on the skin. A King's bath can also be taken as a Cleopatra bath, as well as adding rose blossoms and whey.
 
A King's bath is very relaxing for the body and soul. Muscle tension is released through the warm water and symptoms of stress decreases. In addition, blood circulation is encouraged and the skin becomes smooth with a well looked after and healthy appearance.
 
As with all baths, bathing time should not exceed half an hour to prevent skin dehydration. People with a sensitive circulation and pregnant women are advised to avoid having a King's bath or the bath tub should only be filled to a level just below the heart area. The temperature should be a little lower for people with sensitivities.